The Apache Tribes


Apache tribes were known as fierce warriors and knowledgeable strategists.



The Apache Indian tribes are some of the most well known Native American tribes in history. The name Apache is suspected to have several origins, namely the word 'enemy' in Zuni and the Yuma term for "fighting men."



The Apache Nation

The tribe occupied areas of Mexico, New Mexico, and southern Arizona and consisted of six sub-tribes. The Apache nation consisted of eleven major Apache groups, including the Arivaipa, the Chricahua, the Coyotero, the Faraone Gileno, the Llanero, the Mescalero, the Mimbreno, the Mogollon, the Naisha, the Tchikun, and the Tchishi. They were known for being skilled fighters, and struck fear in the hearts of those who crossed them. They were a large, powerful group and were quick to defend their territory; for that reason, many viewed them as violent.

A Bounty on Apache Scalps

The Mexicans were a significant enemy of the Apache tribes because of the area they inhabited. The Mexicans placed a $100 bounty on Apache scalps in 1835, and when Juan Jose Compas was killed for bounty money, his son-in-law and fellow Apache leader Mangas Coloradas was outraged, beginning a series of raids on the Mexican people.

A Treaty, Quickly Broken

As the settlers moved across the United States and subdued the Apache tribes, a great deal of violence ensued. While some people went easier than others, the Apache tribes eventually signed a treaty with the United States government in 1858. Well-known Apache leader and tribe chief Mangas Coloradas was attacked and whipped by gold-hungry miners, and the treaty was broken. This furthered a distrust of white settlers by members of the Apache tribes, Mangas Coloradas in particular.

The Apache tribes were a nation of proud Native Americans with a rich history. Although they do not exist as they once did, many people all over the world can still trace their roots to one of the 11 Apache groups to this day.







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